Lead Risk Assessments or Lead Combination Inspection/Risk Assessment

A lead risk assessment involves identifying exposures to lead or potential exposures to lead from deteriorated lead based paint, elevated surface dust levels, lead contaminated soil, and sometimes from drinking water.  A risk assessment involves interviewing the occupants, assessing the building condition, identifying different types of paint hazards or potential paint hazards, collection of dust samples from certain surfaces, collection of soil, and sometimes water sampling.  Abatement (long term) and interim controls (short term) recommendations are described in the report for each identified lead based paint hazard.  Paint samples would be analyzed either by XRF or chip samples in a laboratory. Dust, soil, and water would be analyzed in a laboratory.  Dust samples are collected and calculated by the sampled surface area and compared to EPA thresholds which are 40 ug/ft for floors, 250 ug/ft2 for window sills and 400 ug/ft2 for window troughs.  Soil samples are measured in parts per million (PPM) and compared to EPA thresholds of 400 ppm for gardens and children’s play areas and 1200 ppm for other bare soil areas of a property.  Water sampling is compared to the EPA drinking water system threshold of 15 parts per billion (PPB).

Lead Risk Assessments

Risk assessments identify hazards associated with lead and these hazards usually require actions to be taken to correct the identified issues.  Lead risk assessments may be required by federal, state, or local law.  If the amount of any federal funding used for a residential renovation or rehabilitation project exceeds $5000.00 a risk assessment would be required by federal law.

 Risk assessments may be appropriate in the following situations: 

  • Parents who are concerned about their child's lead exposure in their current home. 
     
  • Owners, buyers, or renters who want to know if a home has lead hazards that would likely pose a risk to their family and if so, what control options are available. 
     
  • Home sellers (lessors) who want to document the presence or absence of lead-based paint hazards in their property so as to reduce buyers' (renters') concerns about lead hazards. 
     
  • Owners of multi-family properties who may need a risk assessment (or a risk assessor-developed Lead Hazard Control Plan) in order to qualify for insurance or financing, or to provide additional documentation for liability purposes. 
     
  • When states or local governments require owners to conduct a risk assessment because a child living in the housing unit has an elevated blood lead level. (Public health department environmental investigations of children with elevated blood lead levels often involve more comprehensive evaluations than a standard risk assessment). 
     
  • Property owners who want to understand the full range of hazard control options that can be used to address lead-based paint hazards.

 

Lead Combination

This is a combination lead-based paint inspection and lead risk assessment.  Lead combinations may be required by federal, state, or local law.  If the amount of any federal funding used for a residential renovation or rehabilitation project exceeds $5000.00 a risk assessment and paint inspection would be required by federal law.